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Penrose Point State Park
Southwest of Purdy, WA.


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Penrose Point State Park

Penrose Point State Park is a 152-acre marine and camping park on the shores of Puget Sound. The park has over two miles of saltwater frontage on Mayo Cove and Carr Inlet. Wildlife, birds and forested terrain make this a beautiful park.

Location:
16 miles southwest of Purdy, Wash., on the state's western side.

Acreage:
152.10 acres with 11,751 feet of saltwater frontage.

Acquired:
Penrose Point was acquired in 17 parcels, between 1953 and November 1981, for a total cost of $1,481,172.

Historical Background:
An Indian rock carving, know as a petroglyph, is buried beneath sand and gravel on the spit in the inner cove. Visible to visitors prior to the storms that buried it, the carving was known for its simplicity of design, which features three seemingly unrelated characters.
Large stumps with springboard notches can be seen in the park, evidence of early logging activity.
The community played an important role in the development of Penrose Point. The park was initially created out of a swamp (now the day-use area).
The name honors Dr. Stephen Penrose of Tacoma, who served as president of Whitman College in Walla Walla from 1884 to 1934. For more than 30 years, Dr. Penrose and his family spent their summers vacationing on what is now park property. A prominent church and educational leader in the Northwest, Dr. Penrose was a firm believer in outdoor recreation for children.

Facilities:
The park has 83 campsites, 90 picnic sites, 4 comfort stations, 2 picnic shelters, 1,700 feet of unguarded beach, one 138-foot float made up of four 32-foot sections and one 10-foot section, 8 mooring buoys, 2.5 miles of hiking trails, a group camp with shelter, and a trailer dump station.

Of Special Interest:
A self-guided interpretive trail called "A Touch of Nature" was built by Eagle Souts in 1982 and renovated by a second group of Eagle Scouts in 1991. The trail is located in the day-use area, and extends for 1/5 mile.

Activities:
Trails
2.5 mi. Hiking Trails
2.5 mi. Bike Trails

Water Activities
Boating (saltwater)
158 feet of dock (saltwater)
270 feet of moorage (saltwater)
Diving
Fishing (saltwater)
Personal Watercraft (saltwater)
Swimming (saltwater)
Water Skiing (saltwater)
Clamming
Crabbing
Oysters

Other
Beachcombing
Bird Watching
3 Fire Circles
2 Horseshoe pits
Interpretive Activities
Mountain Biking
Wildlife Viewing

The park has no lifeguard and no designated swim area.

Volleyball can be played on the lawn in the day-use area, but visitors must bring their own free-standing volleyball sets. Bikes are allowed on all trails except the interpretive trail.

Bay Lake, a popular trout fishing lake, is located a mile from the park. A boat launch is available there, but parking requires a Department of Fish and Wildlife sticker.

Boating Features
The park provides 158 feet of dock. A picnic area with tables, braziers and a fire ring with benches are located near the dock. A short trail leads uphill to a small picnic shelter, a visitor parking lot, the campground and public restrooms. The nearest public boat launch is located in the town of Home, three miles from the park.

The park also provides 270 feet of moorage. Boats can be moored overnight at the moorage pier, which has a pump-out facility, or at one of the park's eight buoys.

Permits available at parks offering moorage and at other locations. For information, call (360)902-8500.
Telephone Device for the Deaf, (360) 664-3133.

Featured Creatures
Mammals
Bears
Deer or Elk
Foxes
Rabbits
Raccoons
Squirrels

Birds
Crows or Ravens
Ducks
Eagles
Geese
Gulls
Hawks
Herons
Hummingbirds
Owls
Woodpeckers
Wrens

Fish & Sea Life
Clams
Crabs
Mussels
Oysters
Scallops
Sea Birds
Seals
Shellfish
Starfish
Bullhead
Salmon

Environmental Features
Physical Features Plant Life Special
Cedar
Douglas Fir
Hemlock
Yew
Alder
Maple
Daisy
Foxglove
Rhododendron
Rose
Berries
Ferns
Moss or Lichens
Seaweed
Poison Oak

Driving Directions:
From SR 16 at Purdy:
Follow SR 302 (Key Penninsula Hwy.) south through the towns of Key Center and Home. Turn left at Cornwall Rd. KPS (second road after crossing the Home Bridge). Continue about 1 1/4 miles, and turn left onto 158th Ave. KPS. Follow this street into the park.

Alternative route (from SR 302 eastbound):
From the intersection of SR 302 and Key Penninsula Hwy., travel south through the towns of Key Center and Home. Turn left at Cornwall Rd. KPS (second road after crossing the Home Bridge). Continue about 1 1/4 miles, and turn left onto 158th Ave. KPS. Follow this street into the park.

Back to State parks
Back to Parks main page | Park Comment Submission

Courtesy of Washington State Park and Recreation Commission

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